Touring TDR: How to beat gaining weight in college | The American Word

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Touring TDR: How to beat gaining weight in college


By
Danielle Epstein | 1/13/14 12:00pm

Let’s face it: the Freshman 15 is a real thing. Whether it’s the 3 a.m. Dominos delivery or the lack of physical movement beyond changing the channel, college has become the enemy of all fitness and health gurus.

For the majority of the student body, TDR becomes a home away from home: a place where they can get mom’s homemade meal without the burden of cooking. However, refrain from the dining hall and remain faithful to my main squeeze: Freshii.

Their salads are delicious and their brown rice or quinoa based bowls clearly spell out a healthier option. Nevertheless, the limited hours of the chain discourages students from choosing Freshii as their optimal choice.

That leaves us with TDR, but let’s analyze further. Taking a virtual tour in the depths of the TDR, we find certain stations that cater to particular cravings. Shall we start with the dessert section? Stay away. OK, next!

As far as the comfort zone goes, here we find our typical Thanksgiving-like meal: protein, vegetables, grains, carbs and for AU’s sake, tofu. Starting off with the most important section: protein, stick with white meat.

White meat chicken tends to be leaner, containing a lower percentage of fat. Therefore, search for the breasts and stay away from thighs and legs.

Put some veggies on your plate, although keep in mind that butter can be a main ingredient in its cooking process. Carbs should be included as well, however do not, I repeat do not, overdo it! Remember the darker the carb, the better. For instance, select the brown rice over the white.

The next main station, the American Grille, offers burger, hot dogs, chicken, turkey patties and fries. Lean meats, such as chicken and fish, are titled lean meats for a reason. Rather than red meat, they contain less fat, less saturated fat, less cholesterol and are typically encouraged in healthy diets.

Therefore, the grilled chicken is the choice to go with. The turkey burger sounds like an ideal option, however most of them encompass tons of sodium to compensate for their shortage of taste. Fries should ultimately be avoided, regardless if they are curly, straight, white or orange!

During brunch and breakfast, this station morphs into the omelet bar. As a tip, when ordering an omelet, request egg whites so you can bypass the cholesterol of the yolk.

Moving on, we have the salad as well as fruit stations. Munch on a bowl of fruit with most meals so you will have less room for the fries I told you not to eat. At the end of the fruit station lays an array of yogurt and granola. Granola has become quite a mythical marvel.

Unfortunately, it is not a healthy phenomenon like most females are convinced. This particular food contains heaps of sugar and honey and is beyond caloric.

As for the yogurt, the absence of labels leaves the content under question. With a dairy product like yogurt, similarly to milk, it is essential to know the fat content. If the yogurt is Greek and contains 0% fat, then by all means place some on your plate. Otherwise, do not integrate it into your meal.

The salad bar, on the other hand, should unquestionably be visited. Pre-made salads have the tendency to be soaked in salad dressing so, when craving a salad, make your own!

Last, but certainly not least, we have the pizza station, a carbohydrate trap, serving oh but the finest Italian cuisine around. Although Congress claims the tomato paste on pizzas qualifies the cuisine as a vegetable, that’s ridiculous and absurd. I guess we should classify a taco as a salad then because it has lettuce in it?

As Charles M. Schulz once said, “All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.” But what Charles M. Schulz didn’t know is that a little bit of chocolate, pizza, pasta, cake and cookies every night at TDR can hurt. Let us make smart choices, eat healthy and beat the statistic! Freshman 15, what’s that?